Category Archives: Economics

Cincinnati is 10 of US most toxic cities

A pretty picture of Cincinnati in the news accompanying not-so-pretty facts:

Last year, Environmental Data Resources ranked America’s most toxic cities, defined by the amount of man-made chemical in each area’s soil.

10. Cincinnati

Contaminated Sites: 22,992
Leaking storage tanks: 1,719
Corrective action reports: 44

Cincinnati
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Prisoners are 1 in 100 adults

I’d never realized this fact. It’s striking, to say the least.

Additionally, 1 out of 9 young black men is locked up.
The Pew Center on the States’ Public Safety Performance Project counted 2,319,258 adults behind bars at the beginning of this year. That was 25,000 more than the previous year.
Ohio was one of the three large states whose prison populations rose last year. The number of prisoners in state institutions topped 50,000 recently for the first time.
One in 30 men between 20 and 34 is locked up, the study showed.

Cincinnati’s Soapbox mistakes Charlotte as hot?

A new effort to cast Cincinnati in a positive light, Soapbox Media, has an opening blog post that lauds Charlotte.

For whatever reason, Charlotte is red hot. Everyone’s talking about Charlotte. Charlotte’s buzz has enabled them to sustain rapid growth, largely from a massive influx of young talent. Charlotte’s buzz has allowed them to overcome a location not in the mountains or near the ocean.

Red hot? Compared, maybe to Detroit, which Forbes lists as the number one most miserable place to live. Charlotte is ninth. Charlotte is the ninth most miserable place to live.

Charlotte has undergone tremendous economic growth the past decade, while the population has soared 32%. But the current picture isn’t as bright. Employment growth has not kept up with population growth, meaning unemployment rates are up more than 50% compared with 10 years ago. Charlotte scored in the bottom half of all six categories we examined. It scored the worst on violent crime, ranking 140th.

(Then there’s anecdote. I know of three creative professionals/people who moved from Charlotte within a one-year period. They didn’t move to Cincinnati or elsewhere in the Rust Belt.)